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    ‘I Have a Dream’ Holds 5 Lessons for Speechwriters

    Posted in public-speaking, speech writing

    Rev. King’s stirring address resonates in oratorical circles as well as historical ones – Click here for the full article.


    Posted: January 21st, 2013 at 4:15 pm | Add comment

    Holiday Speeches Special for your office/company Christmas or New Year party

    Posted in Holidays-Celebrations

    Is it your turn to deliver the holiday party speech this year?

    The holidays are just around the corner and office parties are in full swing.  If you are the lucky one who was asked to say a few words at your office holiday party, fear not.  We are here to help with our professionally written, easy to customize speeches for the holidays which you will receive via email in minutes.
     
    Click here for our 2012 Holiday Special


    Posted: December 7th, 2012 at 11:31 am | Add comment

    Giving Thanks with our Free Selection of Poems and Toasts

    Posted in thanksgiving-toasts

    To give our thanks, and express our gratitude for all of the blessings we received this year, and continue to receive everyday, we are giving away our selection of thanksgiving toasts.

    Download them here -  http://bit.ly/free-thanksgiving-toasts


    Posted: November 23rd, 2012 at 11:07 am | Add comment

    Occasional Words Now on Facebook

    Posted in public-speaking, speech writing

    Please visit and like our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/speeches


    Posted: October 12th, 2012 at 5:01 pm | Add comment

    Exposition

    Posted in general-speech

    This kind of discourse, the purpose of which is explanation, is also called exposition. Has it any relation to the underlying idea of the term exposition as applied to a great exhibition or fair? Its purpose is plainly information, the transmission of knowledge. While description and narration exist primarily to entertain, exposition exists to convey information. Description and narration may be classed as literature of entertainment; exposition as literature of knowledge. It answers such questions as how? why? for what purpose? in what manner? by what method? It can sometimes be used to convince a person with opposing views, for frequently you hear a man to whom the explanation of a belief has been made, exclaim, "Oh, if that's what you mean, I agree with you entirely." All instruction, all directions of work, all scientific literature, are in foundation expository. In its simplest, most disconnected form, exposition gives its value to that most essential volume, the dictionary.


    Posted: August 1st, 2012 at 7:08 am | Add comment

    Results

    Posted in general-speech

    This method, followed for a few months, will develop speaking ability. It produces results suited to modern conditions of all kinds of life. It develops practically all the mental faculties and personal attributes. It puts the speaker directly in touch with his audience. It permits him to adapt his material to an occasion and audience. It gives him the opportunity to sway his hearers and used legitimately for worthy ends, this is the most worthy purpose of any speech.


    Posted: July 31st, 2012 at 7:14 am | Add comment

    Self-criticism

    Posted in general-speech

    Try to criticize yourself. This is not easy at first, but if you are consistent and persistent in your efforts you will be able to judge yourself in many respects. If you can induce some friend whose opinion is worth receiving either to listen to your delivery or to talk the whole thing over with you, you will gain much. In conference with the teacher before your delivery of the speech such help will be given. As you work over your brief in this manner you will be delighted to discover suddenly that you need refer to it less and less frequently. Finally, the outline will be in your mind, and when you speak you can give your entire attention to the delivery and the audience.


    Posted: July 30th, 2012 at 7:50 am | Add comment

    Wary about Statistics

    Posted in general-speech

    In listening to an address many people begin to distrust as soon as figures are mentioned. Statistics will illustrate and prove assertions, but they must be used judiciously. Do not use too many statistics. Never be too detailed. In a speech, $4,000,000 sounds more impressive than $4,232,196.96. Use round numbers. Never let them stand alone. Show their relationship. Burke quotes exact amounts to show the growth of the commerce of Pennsylvania, but he adds that it had increased fifty fold. A hearer will forget the numbers; he will remember the fact.


    Posted: July 29th, 2012 at 10:32 am | Add comment

    Symbols

    Posted in general-speech

    Some scheme of marking the entries is a great help. There is no fixed system. Every student may choose from among the many used. If there are many main topics it might be a mistake to use Roman numerals (I, XVIII) as few people can read them quickly enough to follow their sequence. Capital letters may serve better to mark the sequences, but they do not indicate the numerical position. For instance, most of us do not know our alphabets well enough to translate a main topic marked N into the fourteenth point. By combinations of Roman numerals, capitals, usual (Arabic) numerals, small letters, parentheses, enough variety to serve any student purpose can easily be arranged.


    Posted: July 28th, 2012 at 10:31 am | Add comment

    Margins

    Posted in general-speech

    The speech will naturally divide into a few main parts. These can be designated by spaces and general titles such as introduction, body, development, main argument, answer to opposing views, conclusion. Other captions will be suggested by various kinds of material. Main topics next in importance are placed the farthest to the left, making the first margin. A reader can run his eye down this line and pick out all the main topics of equal importance. Entries just subordinate to these are put each on a separate line, starting slightly to the right. This separation according to connection and value is continued as long as the maker has any minor parts to represent in the brief. It should not be carried too far, however, for the purpose of the entries is to mark clearness and accuracy. If the helping system becomes too elaborate and complicated it destroys its own usefulness.


    Posted: July 27th, 2012 at 10:29 am | Add comment

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